Common Superannuation Mistakes

If you are running a small business, one of the most essential employment obligations you should fulfill is the superannuation. Aside from paying super contributions for eligible employees, it is also considered a key incentive area for your employees. One of the best practices to follow so you can prevent problems with superannuation is generating report of bulk payments and regular pay cycle. When you have already paid the super contributions, you need to process and maintain the employee records related to superannuation. However, there are still instances when business owners fail to follow the correct process. Here are the common mistakes often committed when it comes to complying with superannuation laws.

Mistakes To Avoid According To The ATO

  • Missing the due dates
  • Failing to understand when super should be paid for workers
  • Failing to pay the required amount of super for employees
  • Failing to pass on the employees TFN to their super fund
  • Error recovery

These Mistakes Can Be Avoided By Following These Rules:

  • Be sure to calculate income correctly
    Super Guarantee contributions are based on the income of your employees. This is why you need to see to it that their income is calculated correctly. Since the contributions are set as a percentage of regular Ordinary Time Earnings, it is important to note that shift loadings, paid leave, allowances and commissions are included in the regular wage of the employee.
  • Avoid influencing an employee’s choice of fund
    You are not allowed to make changes to the employee’s choice of fund unless you hold a Financial Services Licence. The employee will be the one to find out how to join a fund or get product information. If the employee needs additional information about their choice of fund, you simply direct them to government websites so they can make a comparison of different super funds.
  • Pay your employees’ superannuation guarantee
    Any eligible employees must have a compulsory contribution or Super Guarantee contribution, which is paid directly to employees nominated super fund. It is the employer’s obligation to make Super Guarantee contributions. It is a percentage of the employee’s regular income. As of 2015/16, the Australian Government has set the rate at 9.5% of regular income.

Superannuation Cut-Off Dates

When paying superannuation contributions, an employer must also take note of the cut-off dates. Contributions must be paid at least four times a year. For the 1st quarter covering July 1- September 30, the cut-off date will be on October 28. for the 2nd quarter covering the period October 1 to December 31, the cut-off date will be on January 28. For the 3rd quarter covering January 1 to March 31, the cut-off date will be on April 28. For the 4th and final quarter covering April 1 to June 30, the cut-off date will be on July 28.

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